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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
country and japan. but xi jinping argues the right environment needs to be established first. >>> japanese survivors of the hostage crisis in algeria are back home along with the bodies of nine colleagues. the nation's leaders vow to continue their fight against terrorism. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline". the head of the chinese communist party want leaders from his country and japan to sit down and talk. xi jinping says he's seriously considering the possibility of high level dialogue but before it can happen he says the right environment needs to be established. japan/china relations have been strained since last fall because of a territorial dispute. xi made the comments after meeting with a senior japanese politician. natsuo yamaguchi leads the new komeito party. he delivered a letter from prime minister shinzo abe. natsuo yamaguchi told xi his visit marks the first step in improving relations. he says it's important to continue dialogue leading to a bilateral summit. xi jinping said he respects abe. he said abe was active in strengthening ties the last time he was prime minister a
and japan. but xi jinping argues the right environment needs to be established first. >>> japanese survivors of the hostage crisis in algeria are back home along with the bodies of nine colleagues. the nation's leaders vow to continue their fight against terrorism. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline". the head of the chinese communist party want leaders from his country and japan to sit down and talk. xi jinping says he's seriously considering the possibility of high level dialogue but before it can happen he says the right environment needs to be established. japan/china relations have been strained since last fall because of a territorial dispute. xi made the comments after meeting with a senior japanese politician. natsuo yamaguchi leads the new komeito party. he delivered a letter from prime minister shinzo abe. natsuo yamaguchi told xi his visit marks the first step in improving relations. he says it's important to continue dialogue leading to a bilateral summit. xi jinping said he respects abe. he said abe was active in strengthening ties the last time he was prime minister and he said
to seven straight about 10 years ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening
in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenge for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state, you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the house killed the bill -- ho
faced by all american officials operating overseas, how to remain active in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenged for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and, most importantly, cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of s
its employees. many of whom served in hostile environments. unfortunately, threats to americans abroad are growing particularly those threats are growing in north africa and the attacks last week in algeria again show the nature of the danger. i support having a wide diplomatic presence. we can't retreat. as you for recognizing your testimony. but it has to be done with the safety of our personnel foremost in mind. this committee intends to work with your department in a bipartisan way. and to work to improve security. every organization has its shortcomings to review with welcome them being highlighted, but it's this committee's job to get answers to the tough questions. our goal is to identify where the state department management broke down, thus failing to protect our people than benghazi to it is clear the problem wasn't confined to a few individuals. the accountability review board convened by you, madam secretary, found a, quote, systemic failures and leadership and management deficiencies at sea levels within two bureaus in the state department. according to the board, these sy
for the presentations. i have two questions. one of the main arguments is two days ago good situation or environment for pursuing negotiation of describing 2004. i want to know in light of all the things we know of what the government has received about the taliban and the americans, why does it say that americans taliban ace would find this two days good times in early 2000 when i mentioned iran. could you please elaborate more? the other is in passing i heard something about him yet and iran. they have any role is to discuss. thank you very much. >> katie from the department of state. mr. abbas, you linked the reference, the growth of ttp to the lack of support received two bodies. i went to see if you would kindly clarify for domestic political will and pride i should put that to be provided to? >> u.s. commission on international religious freedom for professor abbas and professor gopal. the role of privilege and in the pakistani offer religious terms. does that play with the populations of taliban assigned? says something that brings people closer to them or is that political verbiage in a diff
kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> developments kicking off our top social media news of the day. the bbc tweeting just moments ago, north korea says it plans to carry out nuclear tests and more long range rocket launches, quote, aimed at the u.s. that doesn't sound like good news, does it? also today the associated press tweeting about secretary of state hillary clinton. congressmen joked with hillary clinton about a 2016 presidential bid. yes, secretary clinton's possible run was the elephant in the room during today's benghazi hearings, and the comment getting a laugh from secretary clinton. >> thank you, mr. chairman. madam secretary, let me first thank you for your service and i wish you the best in your future endeavors, mostly. (laughter) >> and taking aim at lance armstrong, tweeting that lance armstrong-inspi
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> more with senator marco rubio. and house nearly three months to raise the debt ceiling. >> look, i understand why they want to move the initiative forward and i think there is some strategicty to the way they're doing it it and i believe the second part the of it it, congress shouldn't get paid unless a budget is passed. no one wants to miss a paycheck certainly, but i think it's a very valid point and i think that it's not unfair to say to the people if you're not going to do your job, you shouldn't get paid. >> greta: and we keep getting these, like goal posts and mile posts and three more months. >> absolutely. >> greta: six more months and another excuse-- >> in fairness, i think it's the house. if they believed they could pass a bill out of house that not only dealt with the debt limit, but with our debt proble
create a totally secure environment for him in benghazi on september 10 and 11? >> no. the number of diplomatic security personnel requested in the cables is five. there were five there that night. with him. plus there was a mutual understanding with the annex that had a much more heavily armed presence because of the work they were doing in the region. it is very difficult to, in retrospect, to really anticipate what might have been. one of the r.s.o.'s who had served in libya said the kind of attack the compound suffered had not been anticipated. we had gotten used to preparing for car bombs and suicide bombings and things like that but this was of a different nature. and we even saw that at the annex, which was much more heavily fort fid, had much more heavy military equipment, we lost two of our best and had one of our diplomatic security officers badly injured. he's still at walter reed. so even the annex which had more assets in the face of the attack was suffering losses that night. >> thank you very much. >> mr. moreno of pennsylvania. >> good afternoon, madam speaker -- m
. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and it environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. and it was born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to try to get at some of the diversity of the taliban itself at a time when the united states was really puzzling over its resurgence as a movement, as a political force in afghanistan, as a military challenge, and really a challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 defeat of the islamic emirates of afghanistan in which revived and presented itself as a really grave dilemma to the obama administration as it arrived in 2009. and so our effort was to do what think tanks do which is just to try to provide some ground truth and some complexity and granularity about this phenomenon, recognizing that the sort of clicheed iml imagine of a one-eyed mullah and his band of devoted and intractable fanatics was inadequate and really a falsifying of the problem. so the purpose was not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban, but just to start to docu
of the degree of danger that existed at the time. now the environment as changed the degree is somewhat different. now those effects might become dominant. yes, i can see a down side for doing things that you believe are effective and legal and appropriate if it denies you the cooperation of others who see it in a different way. i think we're all aware of that. we knew that. in 2006, it was huddle up, the world has changed, what is appropriate going forward with no judgment whatsoever on what went on before. different circumstances, different people. not -- >> not having read the report, i would say that become its released it needs to be fixed program had no value. they need to take a second look and maybe spend more time and talk to those who were involved in the program. in terms of the ethical question, in writing hard measures, i spent a lot of time talking to people who worked with me. some of my deputies were very senior analysts, very logical. these are folk who is will analyze every aspect of everything. i asked him this question and he gave me a long explanation, 15-minute exp
stability, take care of the environment-- that really becomes a crucial thing and a society can get on a path to be like the u.s. . >> rose: give me an example of what excites you about what we're looking from mapping of the human genome and all the progress made since 2001 when it was announce bide people who had been working on it so hard? >> understanding the genome allows us to begin to understand how life works including how disease works. so taking, for example cancer and saying, okay that looks like breast cancer but it's-- there's many different types there. so the drugs used to treat it should be custom ides according to that pattern. you're starting to see the payoff on that. if you take plant-- because we can look at their d.n.a.-- we are beginning to understand plant diseases and saying okay how can we allow african farmers not have all these insects and diseases that lower their call the ral productivity to be about a fifth of what we have here in the united states. so the genetic revolution is going to give to us in many, many, many forms. when we finally get an aids v
's whatever i want it to be. student: three, two, one, rifle. jason: it's a controlled environment and we really want them to learn here so that when they do go operational, you know they've already made all those mistakes. student uh, pilot, it doesn't look like i ever turned the laser on so i don't know where the missile went. jason: how did that happen? if that would have happened in the real world, that would be a really, really bad day. narrator: unlike fighter pilots who train for a minimum of two years remote pilots learn to fly their increasingly automated drones in less than one. cummings: the faa did a study recently that showed that pilots with real flight experience in manned aircraft are actually worse uav pilots than those that have no flight experience and really come in off the street. you actually bring in a skill set that you don't need and a set of expectancies that you shouldn't have when you're flying a uav if you came from a manned aircraft. so the air force is taking officers off the street with no flight training and putting them through the pr
of environment. we made the decision in the morning well after light. we conducted a strike on the house, and when it hit the target, we're literally watching, i'm sitting there -- my mom -- my stomach's in knots because it was really important to prove what we could do. and, of course, you're worried about collateral damage. civilians, what not. we got the explosion from the bomb, and there's two or three seconds of nothing, we're just sitting there going -- then suddenly secondaries go off, and they go off for about 20 minutes. it's extraordinary what we had hit in that place. that was almost the validation of what we were doing because eventually we learned we could use a combination of things, most notably the full motion video, but also a number of moving target indicators to develop pattern of life, follow people, vehicles and things, identify targets to hit. so increasingly our precision went up. when we went to a place, the percentage of time, you know, which we found and captured or killed our target was extraordinarily high. and it went up the whole war. in august of 2004, my f
the external environment has changed that the degree of danger is different now those effects may become dominant. and so yes, i can see a down side for doing thing that you believe are effective, legal and appropriate. if it denies you the cooperation of others who see it in a different way. and i think we're all aware of that. we knew that. hence in 2006, we huddled up. what's appropriate going forward with no judgment whatsoever on what went on before? different circumstances. different people. >> not having read the c.i. report, i would say that before it's released, it needs to be fixed. if, in fact, it concludes that the enhanced interrogation program had no value, they need to take a second look and maybe even spend more time and talk to those of us who that were involved in the program way back when. i spent a lot of time talking to people who work with me. so my deputies were very senior analysts, very logical and these are folks that will analyze even aspect of things. and he gave me a 15-republican explanation as to why he thought it was ethical and why he agreed to participat
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
open the environment is a good thing? >> you will think this is shameless sucking up, but the best blog out there is national review online. [applause] i look at it every day. the other one i recommend to you is mickey kaus. he writes a blog that is in the daily collar and he is a brilliant new liberal. he ran against boxer in a primary. he had a budget of about $600. he ran for the senate. but he is an interesting writer. he is a liberal who is extremely open and able to see through arguments in a way that is rare. so if you're going to read a little, you should read him. yes, i think the openness is very good. it is that we basically have democratized the political discourse. the problem is that it will kill the mainstream -- the traditional way of doing business in media. i am not talking about liberal or conservative. there is nobody that has been able to come up with a business model that will preserve the newspapers in the long run. so i'm not sure where leads. but right now, ladies leading to replace where would we have known for 100 years, whether leading newspapers, magazines,
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
there aren't frontlines, and there are urban environments. she lived with other american soldiers. she lived in this same very dirty room that smelled of feet almost all the time. they got along very well. i can imagine if you multiply that throughout what they call theater of battle and you have women in these tiny frontline outposts across the country that it would be a major adjustment. they will be logistical things that they'll have to adjust to. not just latrines, but they'll have to have more sensitivity training because these outposts are very macho, very aggress he have kinds of places. it will be a big adjustments. >> but it's an adjustment that the women all welcome. there is a lot of support for this on capitol hill from both republicans and democrats because they all have constituents, and they all see that these women are blocked. they're barred from promotions, and they're suffering all of the trevail of combat or being in a war zone without having the benefits. >> and without having certain, as you say, career advancement. there is some pay implications as well. what i just w
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
to establish a psychology that in some cases led to that environment. i have to believe the more we can treat people equally, the more likely they are to treat each other equally. >> reporter: the decision comes nearly two and a half years after the repeal of another ban "don't ask, don't tell" which barred gays and lesbians from openly serving in the military. >> ifill: for more on how this came together, and what comes >> brown: still to come on the newshour: confirmation hearings for secretary of state nominee john kerry ... china's growth bubble ... and an online "fireside chat" with vice president biden. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: president obama announced his nominees today to run two key financial regulatory agencies. he tapped mary jo white to chair the securities and exchange commission. she's a former federal prosecutor in new york, with a long record of prosecuting financial fraud and other white- collar crimes. >> if confirmed by the senate, i look forward to committing all of my energies to working with my fellow commissioners a
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root. our interests suffer. our security at home is threatened. >> i think she is trying to warn the administration and the world that we cannot retreat from this engagement here. and right now, overnight, we've seen that the u.s. is doing refueling of french fighters in mali, which is very troublesome to some. it is a much more aggressive posture. but the uk has taken all of their nationals out of somalia overnight. this area of north africa as bob and ted were just saying is the most dangerous perhaps in the world, aside from pakistan and afghanistan which are nuclear armed against each other. and pakistan and india nuclear armed against each other and what's happening in afghanistan as we retreat and the effect on that and north korea. so they have to really not just look at immigration and guns and the budget as the next challenges here. >> have we figured out, senator, what the balance is between invasions, nation building, a huge commitment on the part of the united states in this part of the world, and t
, educating kids, having enough jobs, having stability, take care of the environment-- that really becomes a crucial thing and a society can get on a path to be like the u.s. . >> rose: give me an example of what excites you about what we're looking from mapping of the human genome and all the progress made since 2001 when it was announce bide people who had been working on it so rd? >> understanding the genome allows us to begin to understand how life works, including how disease works. so taking, for example, cancer, and saying, okay, that looks like breast cancer but it's-- there's many different types there. so the drugs used to treat it should be custom ides according to that pattern. you're starting to see the payoff on that. if you take plant-- because we can look at their d.n.a.-- we are beginning to understand plant diseases and saying okay hocan we allow african farmers not have all these insects and diseases that lower their call the ral productivity to be about a fifth of what we have here in the united states. so the genetic revolution is going to give to us in many, many, man
't confirm that they did it. there's a new environment in that region. before i let you go, north korea is threatening another underground nuclear test. how credible is this threat? >> it's very credible. we have seen in the past that they have used this to their political advantage. the chinese have put pressure on them at their u.s. request. that's a good thing. >> to not do it? >> to not do it. however, they are pushing the envelope and i believe that this is this new, young leader who's decided that he needs to show that he's in charge, gain the credibility from the military and if that means further isolation through a nuclear test, i think he'll do it. >> kim jong-un. the next day he's launching a missile or threatening a nuclear test underground. i don't know which direction he's moving. >> i think he believes that he needs to get the supporter to prove that he's a hard liner and a leader and will continue -- the only way to do well in that country is being part of the military infrastructure and so he needs to keep that loyal if he's going to stay in charge. i think what you're
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)